Image: Flickr / Arty Smokes (deaf mute)

Image: Flickr / Arty Smokes (deaf mute)

Today over at Quartz, I wrote a quick summary of a coming wave of new gestural control technologies—principally MYO and Leap—that, taken along with the plethora of physical and digital interfaces emerging around us, will move us increasingly away from clicking and toward new languages of motion. I've been mildly surprised at how excited people are by Leap (which has been on pre-order for months, but gets a reaction out of most who see it), and expect something similar with MYO. I'm pretty jaded about things like "Minority Report" because it has become such an unshakeable meme, but clearly these forms of interaction excite imaginations, for better or worse. 

Fragmentation will be an issue to consider going forward. It's one thing to have to deal with a half-dozen interaction "languages" in personal space, at fingertip level, as with an iPhone vs Android device. It's another thing entirely to learn and be willing to repeat (awkwardly) the dance steps larger scale gestural interaction will require. If history is any indication, this fragmentation is likely to become entrenched. As I jokingly tweeted to Quartz's Christopher Mims moments ago:

For a deeper dive into the strange world of gestures and pokes, have a look at the Curious Rituals project from Nicolas Nova, Katherine Miyake, Nancy Kwon, and Walton Chiu from Arts Center's Media Design Program.